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10 types of gyms: Guide for gym owners in 2024! (Part 1)

Types of gyms will keep evolving from traditional fitness centers to specialized studios. Use this guide to understand various types of gyms for your business!

Ready to take the leap and open your own gym this year? Excited to jump into the booming fitness industry but feeling a tad overwhelmed by all the choices out there? Fear not, because we’ve got the ultimate guide to help you find your niche and totally crush it as a gym owner.


The fitness scene in 2024 is nothing short of spectacular, with more flavours of gyms than ever before. We’re talking about everything from eco-friendly sweat sanctuaries to high-octane, tech-driven workout spaces. It's not just about having the shiniest equipment anymore—it's about creating a place where people can hit their personal bests and feel like they belong.


In this guide, we’ll unpack 20 different gym types that are making waves right now. Each one caters to a unique crowd, promising not just a workout but a whole vibe. By the time you’re done reading, you’ll have a solid grasp of which gym style lights up your entrepreneurial spirit and aligns with what today’s gym-goers are actually craving.


So, lace up your sneakers, grab a protein shake, and let’s get into it. Here’s to finding the perfect fit for your gym-owning dreams in 2024!


Source: Unsplash


1. Traditional Gyms

Ah, the classic gym—where it all started! Traditional gyms are the bread and butter of the fitness industry, appealing to a wide audience looking for a no-frills, comprehensive workout environment. 


These gyms are stocked with all the familiar favourites: rows of treadmills, ellipticals, free weights, and machines for every muscle group imaginable. It’s the go-to spot for beginners and gym rats alike, offering a straightforward approach to fitness that has stood the test of time.


Who frequents these gyms?

Just about everyone! From the early morning crowd trying to fit in a quick cardio session before work, to the after-office fitness enthusiasts, and the weekend warriors. Traditional gyms cater to individuals who appreciate a varied workout but might not be looking for niche classes or boutique offerings.


What should you offer?

A well-rounded assortment of equipment is key. Ensure there are enough cardio machines to prevent wait times and a diverse range of strength training options including free weights, benches, and resistance machines. Offering a few group classes can also be a big draw, providing a sense of community and a bit of structure for those who want it.


The ambiance: 

Friendly and functional. The vibe in a traditional gym is less about luxury and more about getting down to business. Clean, well-maintained equipment, spacious layout, and a touch of motivational décor can go a long way in making members feel at home.


Competitive advantage:

Traditional gyms have a reliable business model with broad appeal. They're relatively easy to set up compared to more specialised studios and can attract a large member base. Plus, their familiarity makes them an easy choice for those new to working out.


Initial costs and expenses:

  • Initial cost: Opening a traditional gym typically requires a significant upfront investment, often ranging from $50,000 to $100,000. This covers the cost of leasing a space, purchasing equipment, and initial marketing to attract members.


  • Monthly expenses: Ongoing costs include rent, utilities, staff salaries, equipment maintenance, and insurance. Depending on the location and size, monthly expenses can range from $10,000 to $30,000.


Profitability:

Traditional gyms generally operate on a membership model, charging anywhere from $20 to $70 per month per member. With a solid member base, it’s possible to achieve a healthy profit margin. Offering personal training and group classes can significantly boost revenue.


Pros:

  • Wide appeal: Attracts a diverse clientele.
  • Stable revenue: Membership fees provide a steady income.
  • Scalability: Potential to expand with more equipment or additional locations.


Cons:

  • High competition: Many traditional gyms in most areas.
  • Large space requirement: Requires a significant amount of physical space.
  • Initial capital: High startup costs due to equipment and space requirements.


Setting up a traditional gym in 2024? Focus on quality equipment, maintain high standards of cleanliness, and consider incorporating advanced gym management software can elevate your gym from great to exceptional. And that’s where Rezerv comes into play.


Rezerv isn’t just any gym software. It’s a powerhouse designed to streamline your operations and enhance member satisfaction. From its custom-branded website builder to efficient booking and management systems, Rezerv acts like an extension of your team!


Source: Pexels


2. Boutique fitness studios

Boutique Fitness Studios, where every workout session is like a VIP event and you're always on the guest list! These studios are the hotspots of the fitness world, offering specialised classes like spinning, yoga, barre, or Pilates in an ultra-cool, super personalised setting. Imagine working out in a place that feels like a part fitness class, part social club—yep, that's the boutique studio vibe!


Who frequents these gyms? 

Boutique studios are a magnet for millennials and Gen Zers who crave a workout that’s as social as it is physical. They love the small class sizes, the chance to be on a first-name basis with their instructors, and the community vibe that comes from sweating it out with the same crew week after week.


What should you offer? 

Killer instructors, for starters. The kind who not only know your name but also remember that you're trying to master that impossible yoga pose or beat your personal best in spin class. Classes are usually small, which means you get lots of attention and the chance to really hone your skills. Studios often throw in some themed workouts, challenge months, and fun community events to keep things spicy.


The ambiance: 

We're talking sleek designs, state-of-the-art sound systems, and maybe even some mood lighting to get you in the zone. Boutique studios are as much about the ambiance as they are about the exercise. They’re places you’ll want to hang out in, even after your workout is done.


Competitive advantage:

It’s not just a gym; it’s a lifestyle. Boutique studios are all about creating an experience that’s both personal and communal, which hooks people in and keeps them coming back.


Initial costs and expenses:

  • Initial cost: Starting a boutique fitness studio can range from $100,000 to $300,000, depending on the location and level of luxury. This includes costs for leasing and renovating space, high-quality equipment, and creating an appealing interior design.


  • Monthly expenses: These can vary widely but typically include rent, instructor salaries, marketing, and studio maintenance. Expect monthly outlays from $20,000 to $50,000.


Profitability:

Boutique studios usually charge a premium for their classes, with prices per class ranging from $15 to $35, or more for unlimited monthly memberships. With effective marketing and high-class occupancy rates, boutique studios can achieve substantial profitability.


Pros:

  • Higher revenue per customer: Ability to charge more due to specialised offerings.
  • Community feels: Builds a loyal customer base with high engagement.
  • Trendy appeal: Attracts clients interested in the latest fitness trends.


Cons:

  • Niche market: Limited market size, depending on the area and the type of classes offered.
  • High overhead costs: Significant investment in decor, sound systems, and top-tier instructors.
  • Economic sensitivity: Higher-priced offerings may be harder to maintain during economic downturns.


Source: Unsplash


3. CrossFit Boxes

Get ready to embrace the grit of CrossFit boxes, where intensity meets community in an unmistakable blend of strength and endurance training. Known for their raw, warehouse-like settings, CrossFit gyms focus on varied functional movements performed at high intensities, which are scalable to suit all fitness levels. This is where people come to push their limits and shatter their personal records.


Who frequents these gyms? 

CrossFit attracts a diverse crowd, from fitness rookies to elite athletes, all united by a love for pushing their limits. Members thrive on the supportive community and the shared thrill of completing daily workouts, known as WODs (Workout of the Day). It’s ideal for those who revel in competition and camaraderie.


What should you offer? 

Expect a warehouse-like space filled with barbells, dumbbells, kettlebells, rope climbs, and pull-up bars. CrossFit Boxes focus on functional movements like lifting, pulling, and squatting—often at a high intensity. The key is variety, so no two workouts are the same, which helps to keep boredom at bay and motivation high.


The ambiance: 

Minimalist and raw. Forget about mirrors and treadmills; here, it’s all about the basics. The space is utilitarian but buzzing with energy. The community aspect is huge, with members cheering each other on and celebrating personal bests, turning tough workouts into a group effort.


Competitive advantage:

CrossFit Boxes foster a powerful sense of community and achievement. They’re places where people come to test their physical and mental boundaries and leave feeling stronger, not just physically but also as part of a tight-knit team.


Initial costs and expenses:

  • Initial cost: Starting a CrossFit Box can be relatively more affordable than other fitness models, ranging from $20,000 to $50,000. This is because the equipment and space requirements are less elaborate.


  • Monthly expenses: Ongoing expenses include rent, utilities, coach salaries, and affiliation fees to the CrossFit brand, which can total around $10,000 to $20,000 a month, depending on location and size.


Profitability:

Membership fees for a CrossFit box are typically higher than traditional gyms due to the specialised coaching and community aspect, often ranging from $150 to $250 per month.


Pros:

  • Community-driven: Strong member loyalty due to the communal workout atmosphere.
  • Lower startup costs: Less equipment and simpler facilities keep initial costs down.
  • High member retention: The addictive nature of the workouts and community ties keep members coming back.


Cons:

  • Niche appeal: Not everyone is cut out for the intensity of CrossFit workouts.
  • Safety concerns: The high-intensity nature of the workouts can lead to injury if not properly supervised.
  • Dependence on certified coaches: Quality coaching is crucial, which can limit scaling if qualified staff are hard to come by.


Source: Unsplash


4. 24-Hour gyms

24-Hour gyms are the ultimate convenience for the night owls, early birds, and everyone in between who wants the flexibility to work out on their own schedule. It's where the lights never go out and the treadmills never stop running. In today's non-stop lifestyle, these gyms cater to those who can't fit a typical nine-to-five workout window into their busy lives.


Who frequents these gyms?

From shift workers and busy parents to fitness enthusiasts and insomniacs, 24-hour gyms attract a broad spectrum of people. They offer an appealing solution for anyone who finds traditional gym hours restrictive. Whether it’s a midnight run on the treadmill or a 4 AM weightlifting session, these gyms provide a welcoming space at any hour.


What should you offer? 

These gyms typically feature a full range of equipment, similar to traditional gyms, including cardio machines, strength training equipment, and sometimes even functional training zones. The key is accessibility—members can use the facilities at any time, often through secure, keycard access systems that ensure safety and ease of entry around the clock.


The ambiance: 

Functional and straightforward. The design focuses on practicality and safety, with well-lit parking areas, secure access points, and surveillance systems to ensure members feel safe, no matter the hour. The vibe is less about socialising and more about individual fitness journeys.


Competitive advantage:

24-hour gyms remove the time barrier to exercising, making fitness accessible for everyone, no matter their schedule or lifestyle. They cater to our increasingly 24/7 world and reflect the flexibility people now expect in their services.


Initial costs and expenses:

  • Initial cost: Costs can range from $50,000 to $100,000, as these gyms require robust security systems and durable, high-use equipment that can withstand around-the-clock activity.
  • Monthly expenses: Besides the usual rent, utilities, and maintenance, significant expenses include security and technology to manage 24-hour access and safety, tallying up to $15,000 - $30,000 per month.


Profitability:

Membership fees for 24-hour gyms are competitive, usually set from $25 to $50 per month, offering the lure of unlimited access which can be a strong selling point.


Pros:

  • High convenience: Appeals to a wide customer base with varying schedules.
  • Steady membership: Attracts long-term sign-ups due to the convenience factor.
  • Unique selling Point: The around-the-clock access is a major draw in a crowded market.


Cons:

  • Higher operational costs: Requires more sophisticated security and operational systems.
  • Non-peak hour underuse: Despite being open 24/7, there might be off-peak times with very low usage.
  • Management challenges: Continuously staffing or monitoring a gym can be complex and costly.


Source: Freepik


5. Family-friendly gyms

These gyms are designed to cater to everyone, from toddlers to grandparents, making it easy for families to incorporate health and fitness into their shared routine. It's about creating a space where parents don't have to choose between getting a workout and spending quality time with their kids.


Who frequents these gyms?

These gyms are perfect for parents looking for a hassle-free way to keep fit while ensuring their kids are engaged and active. They also attract extended family members who enjoy activities that can accommodate various age groups and fitness levels.


What should you offer? 

Family-friendly gyms should offer a wide range of facilities including adult gyms, kids' play areas, and classes that cater to all ages. They might feature swimming pools, sports courts, and special classes like family yoga or parent-child dance sessions. Childcare services are often available, allowing parents to hit the gym while knowing their children are in safe hands.


The ambiance: 

Warm and welcoming. The design and decor are geared towards creating a safe and engaging environment for children, with vibrant colours and kid-friendly equipment. The atmosphere is community-oriented, fostering social interactions among families and helping to build a supportive network of fitness-minded parents.


Competitive advantage:

Family-friendly gyms break down the barriers that typically prevent parents from hitting the gym. They provide a fantastic solution for busy families who want to stay active together, promoting a lifelong habit of health and wellness.


Initial costs and expenses:

  • Initial costs: Starting a family-friendly gym can require a significant investment, potentially $100,000 to $200,000, due to the diverse range of facilities and safety features needed.
  • Monthly expenses: These can be higher than average, around $20,000 to $40,000, due to additional staff like childcare providers, instructors for kids’ classes, and maintenance for family-specific amenities.


Profitability:

Memberships are typically priced to appeal to families, with discounts for additional family members and bundled services. This can range from $40 to $80 per month per adult, with added fees for childcare or special programs.


Pros:

  • Broad appeal: Attracts a wide demographic, including whole families.
  • Unique offering: Few gyms cater specifically to families, setting you apart from the competition.
  • Customer retention: Families are likely to maintain memberships long-term as they integrate gym visits into their regular routine.


Cons:

  • Higher overhead costs: Requires more space and diverse equipment, as well as specialised staff.
  • Complex logistics: Managing schedules and spaces for different age groups and activities can be challenging.
  • Safety and liability: Higher due to the involvement of children, necessitating strict protocols and insurance.



Source: Master1305 on Freepik


6. Luxury gyms

These gyms cater to those who seek not just exercise, but an elite experience characterised by exclusive services, state-of-the-art equipment, and spa-like amenities. It's where fitness meets opulence in a setting that feels more like a high-end club than a workout facility. It’s about indulging in a lifestyle that values wellness and luxury in equal measure.


Who frequents these gyms?

Luxury gyms attract a clientele that includes busy professionals, celebrities, and anyone who prefers a more refined fitness environment. Members are typically willing to pay a premium for privacy, exceptional service, and the ambiance that these upscale gyms provide.


What should you offer? 

Think top-of-the-line fitness equipment, personal trainers with specialised expertise, and a range of high-end wellness services such as on-site nutritionists, massage therapists, and personal care services. Facilities often include spa areas, saunas, steam rooms, and even boutique selling designer fitness apparel.


The ambiance: 

Sophisticated and serene. The design is sleek and modern with attention to detail that ensures every element of the space contributes to a sense of luxury and exclusivity. Ambient lighting, art installations, and lounge areas with comfortable seating make it easy to relax or socialise before and after workouts.


Competitive advantage:

Luxury gyms offer a holistic approach to health and well-being that goes beyond physical fitness to include mental and emotional wellness. They provide an escape from the everyday, offering a sanctuary where fitness goals are pursued in utmost comfort.


Initial costs and expenses:

  • Initial costs: The startup cost for a luxury gym is significant, often ranging from $200,000 to $500,000, reflecting the high-end equipment and lavish facilities required.
  • Monthly expenses: Operating expenses can be steep, averaging $30,000 to $50,000 per month, due to the cost of high-quality amenities, staff salaries, and maintenance of the luxurious environment.


Profitability:

Membership fees are at the high end of the spectrum, typically starting from $100 to $200 per month, with options for additional premium services that can significantly increase revenue per member.


Pros:

  • High revenue potential: Premium pricing models and upselling services can generate significant income.
  • Exclusive market niche: Attracts high-income clients looking for a differentiated, premium experience.
  • Brand prestige: Operating in this segment can elevate your brand and open doors to high-value partnerships and opportunities.


Cons:

  • High initial investment: The upfront costs are substantial, requiring a significant financial commitment.
  • Niche clientele: The market size is smaller, which can limit potential growth.
  • Economic sensitivity: High-end services are often the first to be cut when economic conditions worsen.


Source: Unsplash


7. Women-only gyms

Step into the empowering world of women-only gyms, where safety, comfort, and community foster an environment where women can work out without feeling self-conscious or intimidated. These gyms cater exclusively to women, creating a supportive space that emphasises health, wellness, and female empowerment.


Who frequents these gyms?

Women-only gyms attract a diverse group of women from all walks of life who appreciate a gym environment that prioritises their comfort and safety. These gyms are particularly appealing to those who may feel more comfortable in a female-only space due to cultural, personal, or religious reasons.


What should you offer? 

These gyms offer a range of equipment tailored to women's fitness needs, along with classes that might include yoga, Pilates, Zumba, and strength training. Additional services such as personal training, nutritional counselling, and wellness workshops are also commonly provided to support women in achieving their health and fitness goals.


The ambiance: 

Friendly and supportive. The atmosphere is designed to be welcoming and inclusive, often decorated in soothing colours with comfortable spaces that enhance the overall experience. It's not just about working out; it's about building a community where members feel connected and motivated.


Competitive advantage:

Women-only gyms provide a unique niche in the fitness market by addressing specific barriers that women might face in mixed-gender gyms. They offer a tailored approach to fitness that can significantly enhance membership retention and satisfaction.


Initial costs and expenses:

  • Initial costs: The cost to open a women-only gym can range from $50,000 to $100,000, depending on the size and location of the gym and the type of equipment and facilities offered.
  • Monthly expenses: Operational expenses typically range from $10,000 to $25,000, covering staff, maintenance, utilities, and any additional services designed to enhance the member experience.


Profitability:

Membership fees are generally competitive with other specialty gyms, ranging from $30 to $70 per month, with opportunities for additional revenue through classes, personal training, and other premium services.


Pros:

  • Targeted market: Catering exclusively to women can tap into a specific demographic, offering tailored marketing and services.
  • High demand: Provides a sought-after service for women who are looking for a non-intimidating gym environment.
  • Community building: Strong focus on creating a supportive community can enhance customer loyalty and referrals.


Cons:

  • Market limitation: Exclusively targeting women narrows the potential market size.
  • Cultural sensitivity: Must be sensitive to the diverse needs and backgrounds of women to ensure the environment is genuinely inclusive and supportive.
  • Competition: With the rise in popularity of women-only spaces, staying competitive requires constant innovation and high-quality services.


Source: Pexels


8. Wellness centres

These centres cater to individuals looking for a comprehensive approach to health, combining physical fitness with mental and emotional wellness practices. It’s where the focus extends beyond physical exercise to encompass holistic health and well-being. 


Who frequents these gyms?

Wellness Centers attract a diverse clientele who prioritise overall health and are interested in more than just traditional gym workouts. They appeal to those seeking stress relief, lifestyle changes, and holistic health solutions, including busy professionals, older adults, and anyone interested in integrating wellness into their daily routine.


What should you offer? 

These facilities often include a gym area, but they also offer much more. You can expect to find classes and services such as yoga, meditation, massage therapy, acupuncture, and nutritional counselling. Wellness Centers might also host workshops on stress management, sleep hygiene, and holistic health practices, providing a supportive environment for comprehensive well-being.


The ambiance: 

Tranquil and inviting. The design and decor of a Wellness Center are crafted to create a calming atmosphere, often featuring natural elements like water features, plants, and soft, soothing colours. The layout is designed to flow seamlessly from one space to another, promoting a sense of peace and tranquillity.


Competitive advantage:

Wellness Centers stand out by offering a blend of services that cater to both the body and mind, making them attractive to individuals looking to enhance all aspects of their health. They provide a sanctuary from the hustle and bustle of daily life, offering a space where members can focus on personal growth and relaxation.


Initial costs and expenses:

  • Initial costs: Setting up a Wellness Center can be quite costly, with startup costs ranging from $100,000 to $250,000, due to the diverse range of facilities and professional staff required.
  • Monthly expenses: These can range from $20,000 to $40,000, including expenses for professional staff salaries, facility maintenance, and the high-quality equipment and amenities needed to ensure a comprehensive wellness experience.


Profitability:

Membership fees can vary widely but generally start from $50 to $100 per month, with additional charges for personal services and specialised classes. Wellness Centers can also generate revenue through partnerships with health professionals and product sales related to wellness.


Pros:

  • Broad appeal: Caters to a wide demographic interested in holistic health.
  • High customer retention: By offering a range of services, wellness centres can keep members engaged and committed long-term.
  • Diverse revenue streams: Multiple services and offerings allow for various revenue opportunities beyond just membership fees.


Cons:

  • High overhead costs: Requires a diverse team of professionals and a wide range of equipment and amenities.
  • Market education: May need to educate the market on the value of holistic health services, which can be a slow and costly process.
  • Intensive staffing requirements: Requires a variety of skilled professionals, which can be challenging to manage and coordinate.


Source: Pexels


9. Athletic clubs

These clubs are not just about fitness; they're hubs for amateur and semi-professional athletes to hone their craft in sports ranging from tennis and swimming to basketball and squash. It’s where sports enthusiasts gather to train, compete, and improve their skills in a variety of sports disciplines. 


Who frequents these gyms?

Athletic Clubs attract a mix of individuals, including families, young professionals, and seasoned athletes, all drawn by the opportunity to engage in competitive and recreational sports. These members are looking for more than a regular gym; they want comprehensive facilities that cater to their specific sports interests.


What should you offer? 

Beyond the standard gym equipment, Athletic Clubs offer specialised sports facilities like tennis courts, swimming pools, squash courts, and basketball courts. They often provide professional coaching, leagues, and tournaments, as well as fitness classes that support athletic training like swimming lessons and group cycling.


The ambiance: 

Energetic and community focused. These clubs are bustling with activity, offering a social atmosphere that encourages camaraderie and competition. Facilities are spacious and designed to accommodate both individual training sessions and group sports activities.


Competitive advantage:

Athletic Clubs provide a versatile environment where sports fans can not only improve their physical fitness but also engage deeply with their favourite sports. They foster a sense of community among members, often becoming a social venue as much as a sporting one.


Initial costs and expenses:

  • Initial costs: Opening an Athletic Club can be capital-intensive, often requiring $200,000 to $500,000 due to the extensive facilities needed.
  • Monthly expenses: Operational costs are high, generally ranging from $30,000 to $60,000, driven by maintenance of sports facilities, staffing for specialised sports training, and the upkeep of high-end equipment.


Profitability:

Membership fees vary widely but typically range from $50 to $150 per month, with additional fees for coaching, league participation, and special events. Athletic Clubs can also generate significant revenue from hosting tournaments and renting out sports facilities for private events.


Pros:

  • Diverse offerings: Appeals to a broad range of sports enthusiasts and families.
  • Community building: Encourages long-term membership through sports leagues and family activities.
  • Additional revenue streams: Potential for extra income through events, coaching, and facility rentals.


Cons:

  • High initial and ongoing costs: Significant investment required for sports facilities and their maintenance.
  • Seasonal fluctuations: Some sports may see seasonal participation, affecting year-round revenue.
  • Complex operations: Managing a wide array of sports and programs requires complex scheduling and coordination.


Source: Freepik


10. Medical fitness centres

Explore the forward-thinking world of Medical Fitness Centers, where fitness meets healthcare in a setting designed to promote holistic health and preventative care. These facilities bridge the gap between traditional healthcare and physical fitness, providing a path to wellness that integrates clinical oversight with exercise programs.


Who frequents these gyms?

Medical Fitness Centers cater to a broad spectrum, including patients recovering from injuries, those managing chronic diseases, and individuals seeking preventative health measures. They attract anyone looking for a medically supervised approach to improve their overall health and fitness, often on the recommendation of a healthcare provider.


What should you offer? 

These centres are equipped with exercise equipment suitable for rehabilitation and general fitness, staffed by medical professionals such as physical therapists, exercise physiologists, and nutritionists. Services might include personalised exercise programs, nutritional counselling, stress management classes, and regular health assessments to monitor progress.


The ambiance: 

Professional and supportive. The atmosphere is less like a typical gym and more akin to a healthcare facility, with a focus on cleanliness, accessibility, and tailored care. The layout and equipment are designed with accessibility in mind, accommodating individuals of all abilities.


Competitive advantage:

Medical Fitness Centers are at the forefront of integrated health care, offering a proactive approach to wellness that can significantly improve quality of life. They provide a safe environment for those with specific health needs, making it possible for more people to engage in beneficial physical activities.


Initial costs and expenses:

  • Initial costs: The startup costs can be substantial, typically ranging from $200,000 to $500,000, due to the need for medical-grade equipment and facilities that accommodate a range of health conditions.
  • Monthly expenses: Operating expenses can vary but generally range from $20,000 to $50,000, covering staff salaries, facility maintenance, and medical equipment upkeep.


Profitability:

Membership fees are often higher than those of a regular gym, reflecting the specialised services provided, and can range from $50 to $150 per month. Additional revenue can be generated from health programs, rehabilitation services, and partnerships with medical institutions.


Pros:

  • Specialised market niche: Addresses the growing demand for health-oriented fitness solutions.
  • Strong partnerships with Healthcare Providers: Can generate referrals and collaborative opportunities.
  • Enhanced member retention: Providing essential health services can foster long-term member loyalty.


Cons:

  • High overhead costs: Requires investment in specialised staff and equipment.
  • Regulatory challenges: Must comply with more stringent health and safety regulations.
  • Market education: Needs to educate potential clients about the benefits of medically integrated fitness programs.


Friska 🐨


Read next: Best gym decor ideas in 2024 for your iconic gym!




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